The Coliseum is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering. Known around the world, this elliptical amphitheatre was placed in the center of Rome. Construction began in 72 AD and finished in 80 AD. The theater can seat 50,000 people. The Coliseum was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, executions, re-enactments of famous battles, and dramas based on Classical mythology. Today it still stands although earthquakes and stone-robbers have destroyed some of it. Regardless, it is a very popular tourist attraction.

Rome, Italy

WillhiteWeb.com: Europe Travel

Forum

Vatican and St Peters

Awoke in time to catch train at 8:30 but I had to have an egg mcmuffin and I got Eric a banana shake. On our way to Rome. Got off train and headed for our hotel a couple blocks away—the best so far. Went right out into the heat of the day during Siesta to walk to the Coliseum and Forum. The walk down the hill to the Coliseum was cool. It was hot and the lines were really long so we decided to come back and see it later after we saw the Forum. We ended up entering the Palatine Hill by following RS’s lame maps. The hill overlooked the city and the Circus Maximus. Good view. Somehow we skipped out of paying. The forum was cool—but really hot. Got some good pictures and continued walking to the Capitoline Hill, Pantheon, and a couple other churches. We got really thirsty and craved a watermelon. Finally found a supermercato next to the train station and found a park up the street. It tasted so good! Went back to the hotel and cleaned up. Sightseeing more that night. A lot cooler. We walked to the Spanish stairs, Trevi fountain, Piazza, and found a cool cafeteria style restaurant. Continued exploring and saw medieval Cast Angleo and Saw St. Peters at night then WALKED further to the Coliseum and Forum again. Then walked back to hotel exhausted.
[Next day], original plan was to get up early and see the Vatican and St Peters but we slept in. Got on a bus since our feet had walked forever the previous day. First went to St. Peters but entrance to the Vatican was on the backside. No lines. The Sistine Chapel was amazing; I missed the Raphael painting somehow. St Peters inside was amazing too. We found a dead pope in a glass case and a line of people waiting to pay respect to him. Tried for the Coliseum again but the line was long. Saw a few more churches and took bus back to coliseum area near the circus maximus up to the Trastevere area to look for a blanket for our boat ride to Greece. No find—but found a grocery store so we bought popsicles and drank pop—the typical Sprite. Took bus back to Coliseum and pushed our way through like typical Italians just as they closed the ticket booth. Very cool inside. Long day. Really tired. Went back to hotel.
The Roman Forum was the center of Roman public life, the site of triumphal processions and elections, a venue for public speeches and the spot for commercial affairs. The area was surrounded by government buildings. The statues and monuments commemorated the city's greatest men. The Forum has been called the most celebrated meeting place in the world, and in all history. Today the excavations and restorations give a small glimpse of how it was as continuing excavations continue to reveal more.
The Vatican City is a landlocked sovereign city-state whose territory consists of a walled enclave within the city of Rome. It has an area of 110 acres and a population of over 800. Vatican City was established in 1929. Vatican City is an ecclesiastical state ruled by the Bishop of Rome—the Pope. The highest state functionaries are all Catholic clergymen of various national origins. It is the location of the Pope's residence, referred to as the Apostolic Palace. The Popes have generally resided in this area since the return from Avignon in 1377 but have also at times resided in the Quirinal Palace in Rome and elsewhere.

Saint Peter's Square is directly in front of St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City. The open space was redesigned from 1656 to 1667 under the direction of Pope Alexander VII so that the greatest number of people could see the Pope give his blessing.

Coliseum

Home
Europe Travel
Continue with Trip
Spanish Steps & Obelisk
The Roman Forum
The Arch of Constanine
Victor Emmanuel Monument
Vatican City
Vatican City and Saint Peter's Basilica
Vatican guards
The Roman Forum
Pantheon
The Forum
The Forum
Inside the Coliseum
Vatican City
The Coliseum
Circus Maximus
Sistine
Somewhere in Rome

Victor Emmanuel Monument

This enormous white marble monument at the Piazza Venezia was built as a tribute to the first King of a united Italy, Victor Emmanuel II. Construction was between 1885 to 1911.

Pantheon

The Pantheon is one of the best preserved buildings in Rome. This "Temple of All the Gods" was originally (27AD) a domed building so famous that it inspired architects for 2,000 years. It burnt down in 80 AD, was rebuilt and burned down again in 110AD. Finally in 126 AD the Pantheon was completely restored and somehow has survived to today.
italy-the-forum.jpg Roman Coliseum The Roman Forum The Forum in Rome Inside the Coliseum Vatican Guards Vatican City Vatican City Rome Vatican City and Saint Peter's Basilica Sistine Chapel Pantheon Rome Circus Maximus Victor Emmanuel Monument The Forum Italy
roman forum collums in forum
The Forum
At the Forum The Arch of Constanine
The Forum
Spanish Steps & Obelisk Rome at night Somewhere in Rome
The Roman Forum
The Coliseum
Rome, Italy
The Rome Coliseum